How a junior staff member can review the work of his senior

Jedi Master and ApprenticeA story

There is a small team of 4 developers. These guys are very different from each other.

John is experienced and worked for more than 15 years with the company in different roles. His mantra is “never change a working approach”. He preservers the status quo.

William has the same level of experience in the company but has developed a love for the latest “best practices”. He is always on the look out how to improve things.

Mary is with the company just for a few years and then fresh from University. Some of the “old stuff” she is dealing with is hurting her sense of “doing it right” albeit she acknowledges it works. Refactoring would make maintenance and support easier but would have no visible benefit for the end user.

Alan joins the team and it is his first job. He likes the solid and calm approach from John, the energy from William who always seem to find a way to make stuff better for the customer, and the quick thinking Mary who knows tech stuff in and out.

The team leader struggles at times to get them working together effectively. 2 pairs emerge initially, William and Mary driving change with John and Alan asking, isn’t it working fine? Both have very valid points and the team leader would love to get more synergy going and not risking confrontation between the pairs.

Several approaches come to his mind and he settles on breaking the pairs up by switching the 2 younger members around. To get the learning going he asks the pairs to review their work. One of the older guys, John, has a problem with that as he feels Mary being “too cocky” about the old and well proven way he does things.

The team leader remembers a story he heard once how an airline handled a similar challenge. He takes John and William for a walk and explains to them the idea. He asks them to purposely insert some mistakes in their code. That way there is no loss of face, even if the younger guys find things that were made accidentally. He also tells the younger guys so they know there is no conflict between reviewing code and not making friends with team mates.

This approach can be refined to address the different ways of coding, create appreciation of a new way of doing things as well as proven methods.

Good Bye and Thank You

Chocolate Fish

To the people of Tait who have touched my professional and privat life

Good Bye

After 14 years I’m leaving friends and colleagues on my path to different pastures. It is a strange feeling. First, it is like leaving some good old friends behind. I developed an attachment to you and care about your well being and success. I hope I made some contribution to your personal and professional development. I certainly learned a lot. Second, it is like regaining some freedom back, allowing me to look forward, to review, reflect and set new goals.

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Butterflies in my tummy

ButterfliesI’m looking for a new challenge. My dear wife Susani took it literally and asked me if I’m up for a game. I wasn’t sure where she was going with this but agreed.

Which ways can you go?

was her first question. She put my answers each on a sheet of paper. These were for me:

  • “start own business”,
  • “take a similar job with another organisation”, and
  • “go contracting”

She put the paper on the floor and made me stand on one of my choosing.

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The Liability of Complex Communication

Guide4ClearYesterday I found a study published by the University of St. Gallen “Complex to Clear – Managing Clarity in Corporate Communication“.

The authors Martin J Eppler and Nicole Bischof argue convincingly a business case for clarity in all types of corporate communications. They address reports, emails, and even Twitter. That fascinating study can be downloaded from the University’s website and there’s also a presentation on Slideshare.

I was so fascinated by the clarity of the report – it follows to a great extent the recommended principles very closely – that I decided to blog about it straight away. It took me just half an hour to read through the 67 pages.

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Doing just enough …

Good EnoughI just read a blog post by Seth D. Cohen “The cost of doing just enough“.

When I saw the title I mental picture in mind of a certain person. I struggle to get that person stepping up. And here comes a promise that may help.

Disappointment

I really am disappointed by that post it states the obvious and doesn’t address how to create the change of mind. A few days earlier John Stepper wrote about “the Influencer’s checklist“. Now that was much more practical. Thanks John.

Doing just enough is an attitude statement. It tells a story. It says something about not being engaged, not being in tune with the organisation, the team, the project, or the task. As a leader I have an obligation to understand “why”. This is my team and my project. Success doesn’t come by sitting on my hands. High performance teams don’t emerge if I don’t plant the seed, nurture it and get the environment right.

Doing just enough is a statement that something is wrong. It could be a personal thing, it could be a cultural things, it could be a change that doesn’t sit well, and it could be a change in the person itself. People grow and change. A job that is perfectly fine today may not be tomorrow. I, as a leader, need to understand. That’s the only way to decide what to do about.

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Destructive Cooperation

Last week I attended a short workshop. My expectations were more on the curiosity side than anything else. The workshop’s premise was

  • people are happiness seekers
  • people are social
  • people want to be good

That resonated with me well as I strongly believe people are inherently trying their best. Now after an introduction by Niki Harre (University of Auckland) she organised an impromptu role play. There were 3 groups of 4 people and they were asked to come up with ideas for a birthday party for a 5 year old.

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The trouble with Communication Excellence

You know I work in IT. Corporate Information Technology is known for sending out information emails so everybody in the organisation knows if any of the IT services is being upgraded, patched, serviced or replaced with something new and better. And this is not just in those organisations I worked for it’s a common theme in most organisations independent of location and culture. If yours is different – well done!

HR and Marketing have their own share of corporate communication. The internal communication specialists promote the corporate message, tell stories about achievements and are hot on the heels of employee engagement. The external comms master does the same just targeting business partners, contractors, customers and suppliers.

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