The Happy Employee

Happiness in 3 facesEarlier this week a friend posted an article about “Is it your fault when you are unhappy?” The original blog post is actually from James Adonis, one of Australia’s best-known people-management thinkers.

James presented two opposite opinions:

  • “Your employer is not responsible for your happiness. You are.”
  • “It’s not difficult at all for leaders to create happy employees. The only reason it doesn’t happen is if you work for a tool.”

“So, who’s right? Are employees ultimately responsible for the joy they feel at work? Or do their bosses have a moral obligation to make it a priority?

That leaders have a financial obligation is already clear. There are many credible studies demonstrating the benefits associated with happy employees or, more significantly, engaged employees. These reports, for example, outline some of the empirical findings that indicate the positive outcomes include better customer service, higher productivity, enhanced sales and fewer safety accidents.”

James favours the first opinion and continues outlining 4 traits that distinguishes happy employees:

  • A desire to work for the simple joy that arises from doing a good job.
  • A positive attitude comprising enthusiasm and cheerfulness.
  • A conscientious work ethic of hard work and resourcefulness.
  • A proactive approach that seeks opportunities to make a contribution.

He further discusses Unhappiness as a result of “waiting” and concludes:

“So, cheers to the leaders who make it a personal mission to create a happy and engaging workplace. But an even more emphatic cheer is in order for the employees who do it themselves.”

My Opinion

I agree happiness is not something leaders can give to people. That is inherently impossible. It is up to you personally what and how you live your life. That’s why I start every day with a smile and enjoy a beautiful Monday.

Although that doesn’t mean leaders can sit back and relax, knowing it’s not their fault if employees are being unhappy. They do have a responsibility to provide 5 things:

  • make sure employees do meaningful work
  • communicate open, honestly and share information
  • ensure employees have autonomy within their responsibilities
  • foster innovation, teamwork, and be the chief road block remover
  • provide fair compensation and possibilities to grow

If they don’t, people who take responsibility for their happiness will leave and those who wait for happiness to come to them will stay.

To your question, Greg, I don’t think leaders have a moral obligation to create happiness. They work in the same organisation as their team. So, it comes down in my opinion to

  1. What does the organisation stand for, what’s the purpose? Can I identify with that as an individual.
  2. What are the values of the organisation and are they demonstarted by the senior managers? Do those match to a large degree with my personal values.
  3. Do I feel I can make a difference and add value?

If those three questions line up, I can see happiness and meaningful work coming up 🙂

Advertisements

Succeeding on Purpose

I didn’t go to TechEd in Auckland last week, but a friend of mine did. He pointed me to the recording of one of the keynotes, saying if you watch one, make it this one.

Succeeding on Purpose

Succeeding on Purpose

It’s a 1 hour recording and if you have the time, it is well spend. If not, here’s my 5 minute summary:

In this talk James A. Whitaker tells his personal 7 traits that everybody can use to succeed in life. The talk is limited to outline 4 of those and James makes sure he advertises his book about it.

(1) Ambition

This is the only trait that is not optional. Having an aspirational goal is a must. Set your goals higher. Even if you miss it you still end up higher than the mediocre goal you were sure to achieve.

(2) Specialisation

Specialising on something gives you an identity. It is an opportunity to master the topic. Although, make sure you choose something that matters. Be passionate about it. Then comes the important part: Make an elevator pitch in 2 forms, one to tell others “that’s what I do” and the other for yourself, “that’s why I do it”. And don’t forget – specialisation does only work for a limited time. You may need to change 2 or 3 times along the way.

(3) Story telling

James tells us 3 stories that matter. The first is about your role and your speciality (see above), the second is about your project and why it matters (this tells other what you do is interesting), and the third talks about you and what makes you special. The latter is probably the hardest part for me, there are plenty of folks who do similar stuff – how do I compare?

(4) Learning

“We are who we learn from” – The sentence didn’t first make too much sense to me. However, when James continues talking about mentors, yes many mentors, it starts to resonate. Having access to an expert in the field makes learning so much more fun. The trick is to find the right one for you.

(5) Mimic / Imitation

He is an advocate of imitating the chosen expert in that field. The advantage, you learn more – you learn the little things, the things people do unconsciously. Although beware, don’t become a carbon copy. Mimic multiple mentors and become the blend that is you.

(6) Innovation’s long nose >>> Derivation

Re-invent the wheel is the credo! But make it better so that it matters. He talks about clairvoyance and creativity in this context. Clairvoyance is about the knowledge you have about your industry and your ability to predict what’s happening next. This goes back to specialisation. Don’t specialise in ‘dead’ things, specialise in things that are going to matter. Some tips about a creativity are added, where he briefly talks about rituals (or habits) that stimulate creativity, distractions that gives your brain a rest, and being centered – a place or places where you feel comfortable and have the greatest ideas.

(7) Leadership

He left that hanging. I have to read the book!

Why should I do Information Management?

Wanted! people that follow processes

Wanted! people that follow processes

In my previous post I highlighted the 4 corner stones of good Information Management.

  • people
  • processes
  • content and
  • technology

Today, I want to add more detail on the people section. You can have the most clever system and still nobody cares. That would be worst case scenario. How can we pave the way for being successful on this front?

User Experience

About 10 years ago I was the first time involved in Document Management. A small team having experts from the different business areas designed the requirements. A large 20 page document outlined all meta data we could think of, structured in categories and divided into mandatory and optional items. We presented this to a selected group of people with devastating result. It failed the 7 second filing test.

One guy said, “if it takes me longer than 7 seconds to file a document with all this extra data, I won’t do it. I’ll use my trusted filing system where I know exactly where my documents are. Others are most welcome to follow the same process.”

These few sentences highlighted common problems with projects, that were not designed with the user in mind but with a process or an ideal outcome. In this case, all documents would be perfectly tagged with relevant meta data and a process would take care of that.

Lessons learnt:

  • any system must be at least as good as the existing system
  • any trade offs must be clearly understood and accepted
  • and the system must be designed for excellent user experience

Is UX sufficient?

The answer is likely to find in this quote:

Any information system is only as good as it is being used.

Tell me, what else can you do that people use the system?

 

Good Judgement

Last month I reviewed a few presentation on Slideshare and made a note about Hubspot‘s policy approach. I remembered that during a walk at the beach while thinking about management principles. This is the note:

We don’t have pages of policies, instead we have a 3 word policy on just everything:

judgement

Continue reading

Good Bye and Thank You

Chocolate Fish

To the people of Tait who have touched my professional and privat life

Good Bye

After 14 years I’m leaving friends and colleagues on my path to different pastures. It is a strange feeling. First, it is like leaving some good old friends behind. I developed an attachment to you and care about your well being and success. I hope I made some contribution to your personal and professional development. I certainly learned a lot. Second, it is like regaining some freedom back, allowing me to look forward, to review, reflect and set new goals.

Continue reading

Butterflies in my tummy

ButterfliesI’m looking for a new challenge. My dear wife Susani took it literally and asked me if I’m up for a game. I wasn’t sure where she was going with this but agreed.

Which ways can you go?

was her first question. She put my answers each on a sheet of paper. These were for me:

  • “start own business”,
  • “take a similar job with another organisation”, and
  • “go contracting”

She put the paper on the floor and made me stand on one of my choosing.

Continue reading

Delays and Changes

opportunityWednesday last week proved being a turning point in my life.

Tait announced a restructure and as part of it my role got disestablished. Now this has 2 consequences

(1) unfortunately our land purchase is delayed as without an income stream the bank doesn’t lend us the necessary funds. Understandable. I talked with the vendor letting him know. He was very understandable and happy to hold the purchase until we are in better shape again. Good on you Jeff!

(2)  I have a fantastic opportunity to review what I want to do in the future 🙂

Continue reading