Why should I do Information Management?

Wanted! people that follow processes

Wanted! people that follow processes

In my previous post I highlighted the 4 corner stones of good Information Management.

  • people
  • processes
  • content and
  • technology

Today, I want to add more detail on the people section. You can have the most clever system and still nobody cares. That would be worst case scenario. How can we pave the way for being successful on this front?

User Experience

About 10 years ago I was the first time involved in Document Management. A small team having experts from the different business areas designed the requirements. A large 20 page document outlined all meta data we could think of, structured in categories and divided into mandatory and optional items. We presented this to a selected group of people with devastating result. It failed the 7 second filing test.

One guy said, “if it takes me longer than 7 seconds to file a document with all this extra data, I won’t do it. I’ll use my trusted filing system where I know exactly where my documents are. Others are most welcome to follow the same process.”

These few sentences highlighted common problems with projects, that were not designed with the user in mind but with a process or an ideal outcome. In this case, all documents would be perfectly tagged with relevant meta data and a process would take care of that.

Lessons learnt:

  • any system must be at least as good as the existing system
  • any trade offs must be clearly understood and accepted
  • and the system must be designed for excellent user experience

Is UX sufficient?

The answer is likely to find in this quote:

Any information system is only as good as it is being used.

Tell me, what else can you do that people use the system?

 

4 principles of Information Management

Variety - Volume - Velocity

Variety – Volume – Velocity

The world of big data arrived some time ago. And while the amount of information on the Net is continuously rising, it happens on our personal and corporate systems, too. One only needs to look at the emergence of products like “Sanebox“, which helps you manage your email inbox, cloud storage and share systems like Dropbox and Box, and the rapidly rising capacity that Amazon provides with S3.

Every one of us has so much information available that it becomes harder to keep track of what’s important and how to find it again 2 weeks later!

Good Information Management starts with recognising that is necessary to do something about it.

People

This leads us straight to the first principle. Employees need to do Information Management and not just acknowledging it is a good thing. Hence we must put things in place that ensure people act and act consistently.

Process

This is supported by well designed processes. For example, a supplier email comes in advising a new pricelist. Who receives the email? Is it documented where the new pricelist is stored? Are relevant people notified? Is the old pricelist replaced or marked as obsolete? What happens if the email recipient has left the company?

Content

Information Management is about content. Recognise the different types of information from Word documents, to emails and phone call, from drafts to published data, or from project management to customer requests. Create categories that are relevant to your business and link those to your processes.

Technology

Okay, I’m in IT so let’s not forget that the tools you use play a role, too. Where do people store information? On the local harddrives, a shared service, the cloud? Consistently in the same folders or directories? A lot of people use their email system for storage and retrieval. Most email systems have quite good search capabilities while finding a much needed document on a shared drive or even your local computer is often a challenge. Choose technology that does what you want and is aligned how your staff works.

 

 

Geek Time :)

Tonight I’ve finally completed my private local network set up. It is probably nothing for some and quite complex for others. So, here is my little challenge I started with:

Our house is divided into 2 parts, one has the incoming phone cable the other nothing. We have a staggering 15 (!) devices using our Internet from all parts of the property. I wanted a central system for back up and file sharing, a network printer and good wireless coverage while minimising cost. Sounds good?

Continue reading

Gartner ITxpo Gold Coast

nexus of forcesDuring the past 4 days I attended the annual biggest Gartner conference ITxpo.

I haven’t been here for a number of years and was really looking forward to it. My program was not aligned to any of the pre-defined streams and had a good selection of mobile, big data, business intelligence, cloud and enterprise architecture with a sprinkle of leadership and management aspects.

Gartner always has multiple sessions in parallel and I find it difficult to choose at times. Nonetheless I was happy with my schedule that looked ram-packed with exciting stuff.

Continue reading